Mesothelioma.com Resources for Patients and their Families

Bronx, New York

The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of New York City, as well as a New York State county. The Bronx is a 42-square mile area astride the Bronx River, which divides it into the East Bronx and West Bronx neighborhoods. The densely populated area incorporates residences, industry, retail, and green spaces such as the Bronx Zoo, Woodlawn Cemetery, and the New York Botanical Garden. The Bronx is also home to several institutes of higher education, including Fordham University, City University of New York, and Manhattan College.

European settlers arrived in the Bronx in the 17th century. The area remained rural well into the 19th century, consisting mainly of market farms which supplied fresh produce to the city. Between 1900 and 1930, the borough's population increased fivefold, thanks to transportation developments such as the 1904 subway extension. An influx of new residents from the city prompted a construction boom to meet housing demands. Stylish Art Deco residences and commercial buildings lined the Grand Concourse, the Bronx's central thoroughfare. Industry also flourished; by 1919, the Bronx was a center for piano manufacturing, with 61 piano factories in operation. Following the Great Depression, the population declined, and poverty increased. By the late 20th century, the Bronx had become a distressed area, with many vacant properties falling into disrepair. In recent years, there has been an increase in new construction and restoration of historic buildings. The new Yankee Stadium opened in 2009, replacing the venerable 1923 original, and the 1812 Edgar Allan Poe Cottage is undergoing renovations.

The Bronx has experienced several periods of intensive construction activity, putting workers in a high risk category for exposure to asbestos. We have identified numerous jobsites where asbestos exposure has occurred. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma in the Bronx, you may benefit from contacting Dr. Harvey Pass. Additionally, you should know that asbestos law firms represent people from the Bronx who were exposed to asbestos and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma.

Asbestos Exposure at Jobsites in Bronx

The Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance has compiled information obtained from a number of sources to identify the following jobsites in Bronx where asbestos exposure was known to have occurred. These sites are listed below.

  • Alfred E. Smith Career & Tech School
  • Allied Acoustical Company
  • Andrew Jackson Houses
  • Arcade Maintenance Corporation
  • Bronx County Court House
  • Bronx General Hospital
  • Bronx H.S. of Science
  • Bronx Municipal Hospital
  • Bronx State Hospital
  • Bronx Va Medical Center
  • Bronx Zoo
  • Cadet Corps Headquarters
  • Carnes Mckinney
  • Castle Hill Housing Project
  • Circle Combustion Company
  • City College of New York
  • City of Ny Dgs
  • Colletti & Laguidara, Incorporated
  • Company‐Op City, Customers Trailer
  • Company‐Op City, New England Thruway
  • Company‐Op City, School
  • Consolidated Edison Company of New York
  • Consolidated Shipyard
  • Co-Op City
  • Fenton Homes Bronx
  • Gal Manufactruing Corporation
  • Goshen Plant
  • Hell Gate Generator Station
  • Hillside Homes
  • Hudson Carpet
  • Jacobi Hospital
  • Jacobs Shipyard
  • John Purroy Mitchell Houses
  • Langer & Langer
  • Mabstoa
  • Morris Hs
  • National Gypsum Company
  • New York City Housing Authority
  • New York University
  • North Side Savings Bank
  • Otto Stahl
  • Pelham Barn
  • Pelham Painting
  • Powerhouse 134Th St Station
  • Receiveway Restaurant
  • Richlee Acoustics & Fireproof
  • Sanford Maintenance Corp
  • Scott Towers
  • Security Mutual Insurance Building
  • Social Security Office Building
  • Stratford Coal & Oil
  • Sure Fire Fuel Corporation
  • Twin Parks Housing Project
  • Universal Sheetmetal
  • Veterans Administration Hospital
  • Winter Wolf Company
  • World Steel
  • Yankee Stadium
  • Yeshiva University

Construction

The majority of the Bronx was at one time a series of low rise residential properties and larger manufacturing plants where the majority of residents worked. Soon, factories were being replaced and by the middle of the 20th century most residences were high-rise apartment buildings. What officially ended the charm of the old Bronx was the 1963 building of the Cross-Bronx expressway which effectively leveled the remaining low-rise properties. This began a much more difficult period for the Bronx as a functioning borough. Low income housing and industrial abandonment became common. These were ideal conditions for the spread of crime and a chronic property value reduction. This period lasted through the 1990's, when the Bronx began somewhat of urban renaissance. New construction, as well as renovation became common sights in the Bronx. These efforts continue today.

Prior to the recent urban renewal experienced by the Bronx, many of its buildings and infrastructure fell into decrepit condition. As these buildings are now modernized and refurbished, asbestos is commonly found. Because asbestos use was discontinued in the late 1970's many buildings removed remaining elements of the harmful material. However, many buildings in the Bronx never received this treatment and asbestos is still in existence today. As refurbishing and renovation efforts continue, those workers who encounter asbestos may not even know that it is present. It was used commonly in factories and residential properties for insulation in a number of different capacities. Common places to find it are within older insulation, piping, and electrical fixtures. The inhalation of asbestos fibers is highly toxic and has been linked to several respiratory complications including mesothelioma.

Factories

Just like many immigrant-based urban beginnings, those of the Bronx were tied to the manufacturing sector. By the time the Irish and other ethnicities began pouring off the boats on Ellis Island; urbanization had pushed much of the manufacturing to the North of Manhattan. Thus, the Bronx became an important center of industrialization for the downstate economy of New York State. Despite the lack of alternative employment, these factories served as an important niche to new residents of the country who were anxious to find any work at all.

The life of immigrant and other early urbanites was often one of struggle. Many had come from fertile, but un-opportunistic farmlands in their home country or other areas to find the only opportunities for them in the larger cities were dirty manufacturing jobs. Factories were dangerous places in this era and with a surplus of labor and deficit of jobs, there was no real incentive for management to correct the problems of these workers because their labor was so expendable. It is regrettable that during this time and for many decades thereafter, jobs in these facilities exposed workers to many dangers. One of the more common hazards a factory worker would encounter is asbestos. Asbestos was not only a material in many manufactured goods, but also used throughout factories as an insulation material on a large number of fixtures. Those who worked on these fixtures or with asbestos products could be at risk of developing asbestos exposure related respiratory illness and other health complications such as mesothelioma.

New York Mass Transit

One of the most memorable aspects of New York City is the hustle and bustle that the city seems to move with. It has an unmistakable pulse to it that is unlike anywhere else on earth. One of the marks of this pulse is the New York City subway line that transports millions of citizens each day. This mass transport system represents an important part of the Bronx economy, in that it provides thousands of jobs for the local residents and transportation for millions others.

There are unfortunately, hazards that arise within subway and other mass transit terminals in a number of forms. One of the more common dangers encountered by workers in these areas is asbestos. Prior to its ban in the late 1970's, asbestos was used extensively in tunnels and transit infrastructure. Because of its insulation qualities it was useful for covering pipes and electrical fixtures, which need an insulator resistant to heat transfer, for which asbestos was particularly suited. Often these asbestos particles could be disturbed and rendered harmful if they were to be inhaled. This poses a particular threat for workers in poorly ventilated areas, such as subway terminals and subterranean infrastructure. Although symptoms of asbestos related illness may not manifest for several years, it is possible that those who worked in the Bronx subway or other mass transit may have been exposed to harmful levels of asbestos particles. This can be a disturbing prospect for the millions who rely upon these mass transit systems for transportation and employment each and every day.

Mesothelioma Cancer Centers near Bronx, New York

For your convenience, we have compiled a list of mesothelioma cancer centers that are located within a 100 mile radius of Bronx, New York. Please click on a cancer center link to obtain more information about the clinical programs offered, professional designations, areas of expertise and how to contact the center.


Thoracic Oncology Program
80 Seymour Street
Hartford, CT 06102

Distance: 88.2 miles


20 York Street
New Haven, CT 06510

Distance: 58.9 miles


333 Cedar Street, WWW 205
New Haven, CT 06520

Distance: 58.9 miles


195 Little Albany Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08903

Distance: 39.1 miles


550 First Avenue
New York, NY 10016

Distance: 8.8 miles


One Gustave L. Levy Place
New York, NY 10029

Distance: 5.1 miles


Columbia University
701 West 168th Street
New York, NY 10032

Distance: 3.7 miles


622 West 168th Street
New York, NY 10032

Distance: 3.7 miles


Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University
Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus
1300 Morris Park Avenue
Bronx, NY 10461

Distance: 2.0 miles


51 N. 39th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Distance: 92.4 miles


Abramson Cancer Center
38th and Walnut Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Distance: 92.4 miles


3601 Spruce Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Distance: 92.4 miles


233 S 10th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107

Distance: 91.5 miles


333 Cottman Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19111

Distance: 83.2 miles


1331 East Wyoming Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19124

Distance: 85.9 miles


3401 N. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19140

Distance: 88.2 miles

Mesothelioma Doctors near Bronx, New York

For your convenience, we have compiled a list of mesothelioma doctors that are located within a 100 mile radius of Bronx, New York. Please click on a doctor link to obtain more information about his/her background, areas of expertise, professional affiliations, and office locations.

Dr. Roman Perez-Soler
Montefiore Medical Center
MMC Medical Park at Eastchester
1695 Eastchester Road
Bronx, NY 10461

Distance: 2.0 miles

Dr. John D. Allendorf
New York-Presbyterian Columbia University Medical Center
Herbert Irving Pavilion, Suite 820
161 Fort Washington Avenue
New York, NY 10032

Distance: 3.7 miles

Dr. John A. Chabot
NY-Presbyterian Columbia University Medical Center
161 Ft. Washington Avenue Suite AP-819
New York, NY 10032

Distance: 3.7 miles

Dr. Raja M. Flores
Mount Sinai Medical Center
One Gustave L. Levy Place
New York, NY 10029

Distance: 5.1 miles

Dr. Stephen M. Levin
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
1212 Fifth Avenue, Suite 1A
New York, NY 10029

Distance: 5.1 miles

Dr. Andrea S. Wolf
The Mount Sinai Hospital
1470 Madison Avenue, 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10029

Distance: 5.1 miles

Dr. Harvey Pass
NYU Langone Medical Center
530 First Avenue
New York, NY 10016

Distance: 8.8 miles

Dr. Daniel Sterman
NYU Langone Medical Center
530 1st Avenue, HCC, Suite 5D
New York, NY 10016

Distance: 8.8 miles

Dr. Stephen Rush
NYU Langone Medical Center
Long Island Radiation Therapy
1129 Northern Boulevard
Manhasset, NY 11030

Distance: 10.8 miles

Dr. Shahriyour Andaz
South Nassau Communities Hospital on Long Island
One Healthy Way
Oceanside, NY 11572

Distance: 19.5 miles

Dr. Bruce G. Haffty
The Cancer Institute of New Jersey
195 Little Albany Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08903

Distance: 39.1 miles

Dr. Frank C. Detterbeck
Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven
333 Cedar Street, WWW 205
New Haven, CT 06520

Distance: 58.9 miles

Dr. Michael Kashgarian
Yale Cancer Center
310 Cedar Street, LH B20
New Haven, CT 06520

Distance: 58.9 miles

Dr. Jack A. Elias
Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven
Yale Internal Medicine
20 York Street
New Haven, CT 06510

Distance: 58.9 miles

Dr. Carrie Redlich
Yale School of Medicine
135 College Street, 3rd floor
New Haven, CT 06510

Distance: 58.9 miles

Dr. Michael R. Grey
The Hospital of Central Connecticut
100 Grand Street
New Britain, CT 06050

Distance: 80.1 miles

Dr. Larry R. Kaiser
Temple University Hospital Cancer Center
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery
3401 N. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19140

Distance: 88.2 miles

Dr. Joel  D. Cooper
University of Pennsylvania Abramson Cancer Center
University of Pennsylvania Health System
Sixth Floor, Silverstein Building, 3400 Spruce Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Distance: 92.4 miles

Dr. Sunil Singhal
University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center
Harron Lung Center/Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine
3400 Civic Center Boulevard/West Pavilion, 1st Floor
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Distance: 92.4 miles

Dr. Steven M. Albelda
University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center, Penn Lung Center
3615 Civic Center Boulevard
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Distance: 92.4 miles

Filing an Asbestos Lawsuit in Bronx, New York

Don’t lose your rights! If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma and were exposed to asbestos in New York, you may be entitled to compensation. You may have limited time to file a claim. If you have been diagnosed with mesothelioma and have a pathology report in hand to support that diagnosis, you are eligible for financial assistance.

Asbestos Related News in New York

New Trial on Cancer-Related Anxiety Drug Psilocybin

A new trial shows psychotropic drug psilocybin has helped reduce anxiety in cancer patients in conjunction with psychotherapy.

Workers Exposed to Asbestos at Canandaigua Veterans Affairs Campus

Over a dozen workers were exposed to asbestos during recent construction on Building 36 at the Veterans Affairs campus in Canandaigua, NY.

Asbestos Exposure Across the U.S.

Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance Blog

FEATURED CONTENT:


RECENT POSTS:

National Poison Prevention Week: Household Toxins to Avoid

National Poison Prevention Week: The Dangers of Asbestos

Joe Biden Gives a Cancer Moonshot Update at SXSW Conference