Mesothelioma.com Resources for Patients and their Families

USS Craven (DD-382)

USS Craven (DD-382)

USS Craven(DD-382) was a Gridley-class destroyer constructed for the US Navy. She was one of three naval vessels named in honor of Tunis Augustus Macdononough Craven, an officer in the US Navy who served during the Mexican-American and Civil wars.

Construction

Craven was launched by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation in Quincy, Massachusetts on February 25, 1937. She was sponsored by Mrs. R. Leanred, who was the namesake’s daughter. Lieutenant Commander W.O. Bailey took command of Craven on September 2, 1937.

Naval History

Following training along the east coast and in the Caribbean, Craven participated in experimental torpedo firing in Newport, Rhode Island. She then joined her fleet at San Diego, California before cruising to the Caribbean for maneuvers and fleet problems. Craven primarily operated out of the west coast until April 1, 1940, at which time she was based at Pearl Harbor.

When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, Craven was heading to Wake Island along with Enterprise. She was damaged during this trip when she collided with Northampton (CA-26) on December 15. Due to the damage and the additional damage she incurred from heavy seas, she was forced to return to Pearl Harbor.

Following repairs, Craven assisted with the raids on the Gilberts and Marshalls on February 1, 1942. She then went on to assist with the raids on Wake Island on February 24 before returning to her convoy duty and other west coast operations. Beginning November 12 of that year, Craven assisted with the struggle in Guadalcanal, escorting transports over a 9 month period. On August 6 and 7, Craven assisted with the sweep of Vella Gulf, which resulted in the sinking of destroyers Hagikaze, Arashi and Kawakaze.

After providing screening cover during air strikes on Taroa, Wotje and Eniwetok in February, Craven went on to screen carriers in strikes on Yap, Palau, Woleai and Ulithi. She also covered the invasion of Hollandia and assisted with the raids of Satawan, Truk and Ponape through April. Craven then rejoined the 5th Fleet in the invasion of the Marianas. In July, August and September, Craven provided guard for carriers during air strikes on Guam, Bonins, Palaus and Yap.

Upon returning to Pearl Harbor on October 11, 1944, Craven underwent an overhaul and completed additional training. She then carried on to New York before participating in training, escort and transport duties in the Mediterranean Sea. On April 19, 1946, Craven was decommissioned in Pearl Harbor. She was sold on October 2 the following year. Craven received nine battle stars for her service during World War II.

Asbestos Risk on the USS Craven (DD-382)

The installation of asbestos fireproofing in the construction of marine vessels was mandated by law in the US in the early 1930s, after a fire at sea aboard a luxury liner caused the deaths of 137 passengers and crew. Craven deployed asbestos-containing materials in large quantities, especially in boilers and engine rooms, and for fireproofing in other parts of the vessel. After asbestos is inhaled or ingested, tiny fibers become lodged in the mesothelium, a narrow body of cells that surrounds and protects the heart, lungs, and stomach, and over time this infiltration can lead to malignant mesothelioma.

As of this writing, medical science has not developed a cure for mesothelioma. There are, however, there are palliative treatments, like mesothelioma radiation therapy that may increase life expectancy and make patients more comfortable. Those who have been diagnosed with the disease may also desire more information on mesothelioma. Our mesothelioma information kit contains up-to-date information on your legal and medical options for mesothelioma patients, along with a list of mesothelioma clinical trials in the United States. Just fill in the form on this page and we will send you a packet, at no cost to you.

Sources

Sources

Craven. Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Department of the Navy – Naval Historical Center.
http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/c15/craven-iii.htm Retrieved 1 January 2011.

Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance Blog

FEATURED CONTENT:


RECENT POSTS:

National Poison Prevention Week: Household Toxins to Avoid

National Poison Prevention Week: The Dangers of Asbestos

Joe Biden Gives a Cancer Moonshot Update at SXSW Conference